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Classics Club Spin #15

It's time for another Classics Club Spin! I've quite enjoyed participating in these so far, and it's definitely a good incentive to get another book crossed off my list. The idea is that I list twenty unread books from my Classics Club list, and then on Friday a number will be announced, which is the book I have to read and post about by May 1st.
  1. The Watsons by Jane Austen
  2. Lorna Doone by R.D. Blackmore
  3. Agnes Grey by Anne Brontë
  4. My Antonia by Willa Cather
  5. The Wisdom of Father Brown by G.K. Chesterton
  6. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
  7. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle
  8. Sylvia's Lovers by Elizabeth Gaskell
  9. The Little White Horse by Elizabeth Goudge
  10. Cotillion by Georgette Heyer
  11. Elizabeth Captive Princess by Margaret Irwin
  12. The Screwtape Letters by C.S. Lewis
  13. Till We Have Faces by C.S. Lewis
  14. At the Back of the North Wind by George MacDonald
  15. Further Chronicles of Avonlea by L.M. Montgomery
  16. Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
  17. Hamlet by William Shakespeare
  18. Macbeth by William Shakespeare
  19. Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
  20. Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
I'd like it if #8, #9 or #12 came up, but really I think I'd be quite happy with any of these ... although I am a little intimidated by several of them.


  1. My Antonia was a wonderful read and of course, Little House on the Prairie is just as sweet as you could please!

    Good luck on Friday

  2. It looks like you had a wonderful list to choose from. I've never read The Screwtape Letters, thought I've been thinking of doing so forever. I've heard excellent things about it, though. Enjoy!

    1. Thanks! The Screwtape Letters was one of the books I was hoping to get, so I'm looking forward to starting it.


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